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Welcome

Dame Helen Mirren : ‘I am a complete believer in legal brothels’

 

Our website is here for disabled people to easily find safe sexual services which are right for you. The site also supports you to make the most of these experiences. Plus, it provides other important useful advice to you, as well as for your care professionals, friends and parents.

Our Mission is that disabled people can use services to help them move forward towards happy relationships.  We aim to ensure everyone involved stays within the law.

Our Sexual services include:-

Sex workers who share intimacy and sexual pleasures with clients

Tantric practitioners who teach goal-free sex and will provide sexual massage or maybe more if required

Sexological bodyworkers and psychosexual somatic practitioners  who use talk and touch to help remove sexual blocks and help the client move forward so that they can enjoy sex

Striptease artists who provide a sexual performance with no touch by the client

 

For those disabled people who worry - it has never been illegal to buy or sell sex in Britain (however, it is now illegal in Northern Ireland to buy sex. Our sex worker, Laura Lee is campaigning for this unfortunate law to be overturned).

All our service providers sign to say they are not trafficked.

Brothels are illegal in Britain. This is a pity because a well-run, accessible brothel kitted out with hoists, mirrors and sex toys suitable for disabled people would be wonderful.

All the professionals on this site (and other respectable sites) will be free from sexually transmitted infections. In fact, they request that clients cancel if you have an infection such as a cold, since catching any infection would prevent them from working for a while. 

Shame – if you would personally feel grubby or ashamed to book a sexual service, please look upon it as an education – for them to teach you what your body is capable of enjoying, and how to please a partner. They will teach learning impaired people how to masturbate. They are at your service.

If you are a female wanting a male service provider please call so we can help you find the best person for you (see contact). 

Cost – these sexual services cost no more than any other quality professional service and are well worth the money. You can legitimately have your need written into your care package.

Care Professionals - it is perfectly legal to contact a sex worker on behalf of a disabled person.

The law around a residential home actually paying for this service is complicated, seek legal guidance.

If your client lacks mental capacity, you and members of your practice can decide what is in their best interest and document how this decision was reached and, once this is done, legally proceed to find sexual help for him or her.

It is perfectly legal for for a disabled resident to invite a sex worker into their room in their residential establishment or hospice.

It is illegal not to support disabled people to enjoy the same pleasures as others enjoy in the privacy of the their own homes (Equality Act 2010, Human Rights Act 1998).

 

Local Authorities

Personal benefits certainly can legally, and do, in some circumstances, cover costs.

The importance of this site - we get hundreds of people looking at this site every day, so we know we are of interest. If we make disabled people happy and enjoy more fulfilled lives, we feel we have achieved our goal.

New service providers join our site all the time, but if there is no sex worker suitable near you, try AdultWork or, for gay sex workers, www.sleepyboy.com. They vet their service providers like we do. Using a ‘reverse booking’ on AdultWork allows you to state what you are looking for.

See our Advice for more information.

claire-de-than

 

Claire de Than
Professor of Human Rights Law who tells us

It is illegal not to support disabled people to enjoy the same pleasures as others enjoy in the privacy of the their own homes (Equality Act 2010, Human Rights Act 1998).